Anne-Sophie Landou

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© Anne-Sophie Landou

I love Anne-Sophie Landou’s quirky style. In her photographs things appear as though  belonging to an alternative reality where everything is slightly offbeat and strange. Just lately, we chatted about her work and the things that inspire her.

Hi Anne-Sophie, please tell me a little about yourself. 

Hello Snapshot Aesthetic! I am Anne-Sophie, a 29 year-old self-taught French photographer based in Marseilles. I also have a law degree. Travels, people, music, nature, animals, art, society, words, food, dreams, everything is an inspiration to me. I guess I would describe my photography as intuitive, raw and quirky.

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© Anne-Sophie Landou
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© Anne-Sophie Landou

How did you develop an interest in photography?

Words are my first love, but I have always been fascinated with images (movies, magazines, painting etc…). I grabbed a camera ‘for fun’ when I was a teen, I used to play with disposable cameras and I borrowed my parent’s first digital camera, a little Olympus when I was 14. In my head I wasn’t even ‘taking pictures’.

Photography became serious to me in high school when I got sick. I suffer from anxiety and chronic depression. For a year, I took intimate pictures of my closest friends, pictures of my family, of my dog, a lot of self portraits, and it literally saved me.

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© Anne-Sophie Landou

What cameras do you prefer to use?

 Digital, analog, reflex, compact, smart phone, whatever the medium is, ONLY IMAGES MATTER TO ME. I tend to use flash and colour though. 

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© Anne-Sophie Landou
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© Anne-Sophie Landou

4. Do you have a favourite photographer or artist whose work you admire?

 So hard to answer!!!! Martin Parr and Cindy Sherman were the first photographers to blow my mind. Boris Mikhailov, Roger Ballen, William Eggleston and Richard Billingham are major to me as well. I would add Picasso and Nicolas de Staël concerning influences.

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© Anne-Sophie Landou

Thanks Anne-Sophie!

If you would like to see more of Anne-Sophie’s work, find her on Instagram, Flickr and Tumblr.

Also, go check out PoppyMag, her wonderful contemporary photo zine which she curates on Instagram.

Ruth McMillan

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© Ruth McMillan

I’ve been following Ruth McMillan‘s work for years, after seeing her raw, gritty photographs on Tumblr. Whether documenting her travels or capturing intimate moments spent with her muse, Sandra, her pictures are always interesting. We recently chatted about her work and inspiration.

Hi Ruth, please tell me a little about yourself. 

Hiii, I’m Ruth, I live in Glasgow but I’m originally from Northern Ireland. I’m currently
working on self publishing a poetry/prose book and also a photography book.

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© Ruth McMillan

How did you develop an interest in photography?

My Nana helped me to buy a digital Nikon camera because I wanted to photograph sunsets. I had that for a couple years until a few friends started using film cameras, so I bought a Holga and fell for the magic of film. Shortly after that, I met Sandra and she became my muse, and I bought a Kodak point and shoot camera on eBay which helped me develop my aesthetic further.

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© Ruth McMillan
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© Ruth McMillan

What cameras do you prefer to use?

I’ve been using the same 3 cameras now for a couple years, before that I experimented with many until I found my favourite. I use a Pentax slr, Mju and a Kodak point and shoot.

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© Ruth McMillan

Do you have a favourite photographer or artist whose work you admire?

I have many, some of them are… Justin Apperley, Perpetual Kitten, Joe Nigel Coleman, Isa Gelb and Alessandro Ruggieri. You can find these guys on Instagram.

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© Ruth McMillan

Thanks Ruth!

If you’re interested in seeing more of Ruth’s work, go check out her website or find her on Instagram.

Ben Roberts

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© Ben Roberts

Ben Roberts always seems to be creating new work. Every time I look at his Flickr, there is something new to see. His photographs are beautiful and atmospheric, with many of them being shot at night. We recently spoke about his work and inspiration.

Hi Ben, please tell me a little about yourself. 

I am a 38 year old American living in Japan. I live in the nature heavy area of Nagano. I live with my standard poodle. I actually grew up here in Japan, (my parents were Christian missionaries), but I didn’t attend the public schools. I am not a professional photographer, I just love photography.

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© Ben Roberts
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© Ben Roberts

How did you develop an interest in photography?

I always enjoyed the idea of photography as a medium for capturing memories. I shot instant cameras for fun while I was at college in America. When I got my first digital camera and started to take photos of things around me, I figured I would get more serious and bought a DSLR. Film photos were always more beautiful to me, and when I inherited a film camera, there was no turning back.

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© Ben Roberts

What cameras do you prefer to use?

I have used and owned a lot of different cameras. The film camera I first inherited was a Minolta CLE – a really nice rangefinder that is pretty much a Leica. I still use that camera. I also bought a Pentax LX which is great for the type of photography I shoot. I also love my Mamiya 7.  I have found I love the look of reversal film.

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© Ben Roberts

Do you have a favourite photographer or artist whose work you admire?

I spent tons of time on Flickr, so was inspired by many photographers on there, like Patrick Joust, for example.  I also like movie directors like David Lynch because I find their images inspiring.

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© Ben Roberts

Thanks Ben!

If you’re interested in seeing more of Ben’s work, go check out his website or follow him on Flickr and Instagram.

Amanda Elledge

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© Amanda Elledge

I’ve been following Amanda Elledge on Flickr for a few years now. Her gorgeous, ethereal photographs constantly surprise and impress me; not least because I can’t figure out how she makes them! Just recently, I got around to asking her about her work and inspiration. 

Hi Amanda, please tell me a little about yourself.

I was born and raised in the USA but I have been living in northern France for 15 years now. Both countries define me and yet, neither feels like home, but I’m pretty sure it’s the same for most people in my situation.

I work in a laboratory for diabetes research, and more specifically, I am part of a cell therapy team that isolates pancreatic islets from donor pancreases in order to treat – and sometimes cure – fragile type I diabetics.

Like most people, I love photography, reading and music, but I also love red lipstick, the smell of musty basements, good champagne and listening to podcasts about microorganisms and mental health.

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© Amanda Elledge

How did you develop an interest in photography?

Of course, like a lot of semi-tortured young women, I went through a whole Diane Arbus phase (to accompany my Joy Division phase), but years after that, I had a French-New Zealander girlfriend introduce me to Flickr (online photography platform) and I was instantly hooked.

At first, I was one of those mommy-type bloggers, more into the community than into the imagery, posting mundane pictures from my daily life. Then, one day, I just kind of felt like a fake, only craving interaction and faves, losing myself in a world that functioned off of the “I like you/you like me” notion and – quite frankly – didn’t interest me at all. So, I decided to take back my own passions and life, and from that moment on, I only posted pictures that felt true to me and only faved photos that I genuinely liked. Of course, the transition surprised a lot of my followers at the time, but I didn’t care: I finally felt real and free.

Since then, I’ve always used photography as an intimate visual diary, a way to remember various moments from my life, as well as my own emotions. Whether the viewer gets it, or even likes it, is besides the point. Nonetheless, I do like sharing my photos online because I feel like it can act as a kind of filter and an SOS to other alike human beings out there; and from the messages I’ve received over the years, what I’ve noticed is that my photos generally impact the kind of person I was hoping they would impact. It’s always such a pleasure to discover and exchange with and/or inspire other people who seem to share the same inside joke as you.

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© Amanda Elledge
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© Amanda Elledge

What cameras do you prefer to use?

To be completely honest, I would love to use my Fuji Instax Wide all of the time (think: instant gratification), but since film is too expensive, I prefer to use my iPhone camera. It’s easy, it’s light, and most importantly – it’s always on me.

I’m not one of “those photographers”, that seems overly concerned by the technical aspects of photography and the size of the image. I’ve never had any formal training and I’m not that interested in having any – even though I have lost a few publishing opportunities because of my less-than-stunning image size and quality. I guess it would be more disconcerting to me if I was counting on photography to survive but luckily it’s just my passion.  Furthermore, it’s never really bothered me, the idea that a digital image might change according to its printing medium or format. I like the idea that slight variations of the same image co-exist, depending on the computer screen used to view the image as well as the discrepancies in our own eyes looking at that same image. It makes me think of how an analog photo might change depending on its raw materials or who developed it, or how it may change with time and through its environment. And, even if this was not the photographer’s original vision, I think that all of these “imperfections” give the image life.

All that said, I do use other cameras, including a Canon EOS 7d, a Lomo LC-A and a scanner.  My latest acquisition is Lomography’s La Sardina, but I have yet to use it. On that note, I have absolutely no qualms abouts mixing both analog and digital to create my final images.

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© Amanda Elledge
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© Amanda Elledge

Do you have a favourite photographer or artist whose work you admire?

I guess if you would have asked me this question a few years ago, I would have answered without hesitation: Daidō Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira, Jacob Aue Sobol and Anders Petersen (all while drowning in an amazing Godspeed You! Black Emperor album), but I think the real answer is merely an accumulation of everything I’ve seen and lived…graphic novels, music, art, fashion, cinema, language in all its forms, micro/macroscopic patterns in nature and in life, love, lust, loss, confusion, human relations and of course, the millions of photographs from both amateurs and professionals I’ve looked at in my lifetime.

At the height of my photography obsession, I was easily looking through 1000 images per day. One of my biggest joys is to quickly scroll through photography platform websites and find and fave images that move/touch/inspire/impress me. No contemplation necessary: it all happens within a split-second, either I find it aesthetically pleasing or I don’t.

A photograph is like a tiny magical portal into another world, and I don’t care about the techniques or the equipment used to create it.  I only care about whether or not I want to be part of that world, and for that, I just follow my heart.

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© Amanda Elledge

Thanks Amanda!

For anyone interested in seeing more of Amanda’s work, go check out her website or follow her on Flickr, Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook.

Simone Barbieri

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© Simone Barbieri

Italian photographer, Simone Barbieri is one of my favourite artists on Flickr. I love his off-kilter, surreal images and the fact he embraces flaws and mistakes. He also curates the brilliant asapmag.tumblr.com. We recently chatted about his work and inspiration.

Hi Simone, please tell me a little about yourself.

My name is Simone, 40 years old from Milano, Italy.

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© Simone Barbieri

How did you develop an interest in photography?

I started to take analog photos more than 20 years ago. I’m influenced by billboards, signs, minimalism and movies. I try to pay attention to portraying subjects within their own atmosphere and to not decontextualize them.

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© Simone Barbieri
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© Simone Barbieri

What cameras do you prefer to use?

Canon at1, Canon Prima Zoon 90u, Olympus Trip 35, Olympus AF10, Olympus Mju II, disposable cameras, Fuji x series and smartphone.

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© Simone Barbieri

Do you have a favourite photographer or artist whose work you admire?

I admire William Eggleston, Luigi Ghirri, Martin Parr, Nan Goldin, Andreas Gursky, Robert Frank and many others.

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© Simone Barbieri

Thanks Simone!

For anyone interested in seeing more of Simone’s work, go check out his Instagram, Tumblr and Flickr.

Pablo Cainero

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© Pablo Cainero

I recently chatted with Pablo Cainero, an Argentinian photographer whose work I’ve been following after seeing his evocative street portraits and scenes taken around Santa FE.

Hi Pablo, can you please tell me a little about yourself?

I’m from Santa Fe, a province in Argentina. I was born, live and work in San José del Rincón, a small coastal city of that province. I studied at art school and work as an art teacher, as well as in a ceramics workshop.

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© Pablo Cainero

How did you develop an interest in photography?

I think I became interested in photography when I was an art school student. With my peers, we’d go to different exhibitions of painting and sculpture but I was more attracted to photography. I felt that stories could be made using that medium but I mainly used it as a graphic resource for my illustration work (textures or objects that I then combined digitally). Taking photography classes as an optional workshop of the art school was a good technical and theoretical support on this medium. The photography teacher offered us readings of texts by Susan Sontag and Walter Benjamin and thus expanded our understanding of photography.

One day, in a store, I found a small picture book called The Bridges of Madison County. At that moment I discovered the poetic side of photography because together with the photos there are fragments of phrases, like short reflections. That little book helped me understand the intimate strength of photography. 

In addition, an excellent local photographer called Federico Inchauspe used to recommend me the work of other photographers, like Robert Frank, but I am also inspired by movies and music. In this way, I discovered and appreciated photography more and more.

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© Pablo Cainero
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© Pablo Cainero

What cameras do you prefer to use?

I prefer to use compact cameras. I feel more comfortable with this equipment and also think they’re less invasive when taking pictures in the street or photographing people in different situations.

In the street, I commonly use a Pentax Q, a very small mirrorless camera but I usually also carry a point and shoot analog camera. I almost always use a wide angle lens, which allows me to get close and capture much of the scene. I don’t carry more than two cameras in my bag when outside but this does depend on the situation. For example, at some night events I use DSLR cameras with fixed focal lights and 35mm or 50mm lenses. 

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© Pablo Cainero
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© Pablo Cainero

Do you have a favourite photographer or artist whose work you admire?

Yes, there are several. I could mention some classics like Garry Winogrand, Weegee, Josef Koudelka and other great artists but I feel a deep respect for the work of the photographers I know here, in my town and the city, especially Federico Inchauspe, Gastón Cerbino and Esteban Courtalon.  Maybe the reason I feel influenced by these photographers is because they took as one of their themes the coast of Santa Fe, with its natural and idiosyncratic features.

I don’t know if it’s possible to get to know people through their work (I even think that it is not necessary to know the person) but I do consider direct communication and the exchange of ideas fundamental to learning. In my case, photography is a hobby and an exciting path. It’s not my goal to earn money or build a career. Few things give me as much pleasure as going out and connecting with the world through a camera, then going home to see what I’ve found. There are days with more or less luck, though I usually file those photos, then I go back after a while to review them and end up seeing them differently.

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© Pablo Cainero

Thanks Pablo!

For anyone interested in seeing more of Pablo’s work, go check out his Flickr.